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10 Questions to Ask Home Inspectors

Before you make your final buying or selling decision, you should have the home inspected by a professional. An inspection can alert you to potential problems with a property and allow you to make an informed decision. Ask these questions to prospective home inspectors:

1. Will your inspection meet recognized standards Ask whether the inspection and the inspection report will meet all state requirements and comply with a well-recognized standard of practice and code of ethics, such as the one adopted by the American Society of Home Inspectors or the National Association of Home Inspectors. Customers can view each group s standards of practice and code of ethics online at www.ashi.org or www.nahi.org. ASHI s Web site also provides a database of state regulations.

2. Do you belong to a professional home inspector association There are many state and national associations for home inspectors, including the two groups mentioned in No. 1. Unfortunately, some groups confer questionable credentials or certifications in return for nothing more than a fee. Insist on members of reputable, nonprofit trade organizations; request to see a membership ID.

3. How experienced are you Ask how long inspectors have been in the profession and how many inspections they ve completed. They should provide customer referrals on request. New inspectors also may be highly qualified, but they should describe their training and let you know whether they plan to work with a more experienced partner.

4. How do you keep your expertise up to date Inspectors commitment to continuing education is a good measure of their professionalism and service. Advanced knowledge is especially important in cases in which a home is older or includes unique elements requiring additional or updated training.

5. Do you focus on residential inspection Make sure the inspector has training and experience in the unique discipline of home inspection, which is very different from inspecting commercial buildings or a construction site. If your customers are buying a unique property, such as a historic home, they may want to ask whether the inspector has experience with that type of property in particular.

6. Will you offer to do repairs or improvements Some state laws and trade associations allow the inspector to provide repair work on problems uncovered during the inspection. However, other states and associations forbid it as a conflict of interest. Contact your local ASHI chapter to learn about the rules in your state.

7. How long will the inspection take On average, an inspector working alone inspects a typical single-family house in two to three hours; anything significantly less may not be thorough. If your customers are purchasing an especially large property, they may want to ask whether additional inspectors will be brought in.

8. What s the cost Costs can vary dramatically, depending on your region, the size and age of the house, and the scope of services. The national average for single-family homes is about $320, but customers with large homes can expect to pay more. Customers should be wary of deals that seem too good to be true.

9. What type of inspection report do you provide Ask to see samples to determine whether you will understand the inspector’s reporting style. Also, most inspectors provide their full report within 24 hours of the inspection.

10. Will I be able to attend the inspection The answer should be yes. A home inspection is a valuable educational opportunity for the buyer. An inspector’s refusal to let the buyer attend should raise a red flag.

Source: Rob Paterkiewicz, executive director, American Society of Home Inspectors, Des Plaines, Ill., www.ashi.org.

Reprinted from REALTOR magazine (REALTOR.org/realtormag) with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS .
Copyright 2008. All rights reserved.

6 Creative Ways to Afford a Home

1. Investigate local, state, and national down payment assistance programs. These programs give qualified applicants loans or grants to cover all or part of your required down payment. National programs include the Nehemiah program, www.getdownpayment.com, and the American Dream Down Payment Fund from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, www.hud.gov.

2. Explore seller financing. In some cases, sellers may be willing to finance all or part of the purchase price of the home and let you repay them gradually, just as you would do with a mortgage.

3. Consider a shared-appreciation or shared-equity arrangement. Under this arrangement, your family, friends, or even a third-party may buy a portion of the home and share in any appreciation when the home is sold. The owner/occupant usually pays the mortgage, property taxes, and maintenance costs, but all the investors’ names are usually on the mortgage. Companies are available that can help you find such an investor, if your family can t participate.

4. Ask your family for help. Perhaps a family member will loan you money for the down payment or act as a co-signer for the mortgage. Lenders often like to have a co-signer if you have little credit history.

5. Lease with the option to buy. Renting the home for a year or more will give you the chance to save more toward your down payment. And in many cases, owners will apply some of the rental amount toward the purchase price. You usually have to pay a small, nonrefundable option fee to the owner.

6. Consider a short-term second mortgage. If you can qualify for a short-term second mortgage, this would give you money to make a larger down payment. This may be possible if you re in good financial standing, with a strong income and little other debt.

Reprinted from REALTOR magazine (REALTOR.org/realtormag) with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS .
Copyright 2008. All rights reserved.

Lender or Broker?

Make an Informed Decision

When it comes time to look for financing for your upcoming purchase, there are a couple of options. You can go directly to a lender or use a mortgage broker. Your real estate agent may have a list of good lenders and mortgage brokers in your area. In addition, most major daily newspapers have home buying sections in their weekend editions. This is another good place to find information about lenders and mortgage brokers in your area. And finally, a simple search on the internet will turn up many suggestions for home loans.

A lender typically is a bank, mortgage company, credit union or savings and loan. A mortgage broker is a middleman who is usually independent of a lender. Mortgage brokers arrange loans from various sources and earn a commission for their services.

Some lenders will charge for the pre-approval process given the extra effort involved. However, do not choose a lender solely because they don’t charge for this process. Look at all of the costs involved!

To choose a good lender, do research on those in your area. Check interest rates, fees and loan terms against other lenders. Just be sure to take the time to research and compare different lenders so you get the best deal. Often, lenders will look for borrowers without any special circumstances. That is, they’ll want a good or better credit score, documented income, and a standard piece of property to lend on.

Comparing mortgage brokers is a good idea too. If one happens to offer rates and terms that are drastically better than anyone else out there, this could be a warning sign! Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. A good mortgage broker will be able to do your mortgage shopping for you. They’ll compare rates and fees, while looking for a lender that suits your individual needs. They should also be able to explain the details of the loan to your satisfaction. In addition, if any of the special circumstances discussed above low credit scores, undocumented income or a unique piece of property apply to you, a good mortgage broker can help make a difference.

What s the Score

Your credit score or FICO score (for Fair, Isaac and Company, which created the system) is a number that indicates the health of your credit. The higher the score, the healthier your credit and the more likely a lender is to approve a loan with good terms. Scores can range from 300 to over 900, with the typical credit score falling in the 600s to 700s.

Credit scores take five different financial areas into account. The  five C s of credit that lenders will look at include:

Capacity. Are you able to repay the debt The lender verifies your employment information: occupation, length of employment, income.
He or she reviews your expenses: how many dependents you have, if you pay alimony and/or child support, your other obligations.

Credit history. Based upon your past payment habits, how likely is it that you will make your monthly payment The lender looks at how much you owe, how often you borrow, whether you live within your means, and whether you pay your bills on time.
BEWARE! As your credit score goes down, mortgage fees and costs, interest rates and other costs go up, up, up! A typical 7% mortgage with a few thousand dollars in fees can go up to an 18% monster with many thousands in fees if you have a low credit score.

Capital. Do you have enough cash on hand for the down payment and closing costs Are you receiving a gift from a relative Will you have reserve money left over after the purchase

Collateral. Is the value of the property worth the investment Is it in sufficiently good condition and is the price appropriate for the home If you do not repay the debt, will the lender be able to recover his investment

Character. Have you disclosed all your debts If you had previous credit problems, did you disclose them

5 Tips for Buying a Foreclosure

By: G. M. Filisko

Get prequalified for a loan and set aside funds, and you’ll be ready to purchase a foreclosed home.

When lenders take over a home through foreclosure, they want to sell it as quickly as possible. Since lenders aren’t in the real estate business, they turn to real estate brokers for help marketing their properties. Buying a foreclosed home through the multiple listing service can be a bargain, but it can also be a problem-filled process. Here are five tips to help you buy smart.

1. Choose a foreclosure sale expert. Lenders rarely sell their own foreclosures directly to consumers. They list them with real estate brokers. You can work with a real estate agent who sells foreclosed homes for lenders, or have a buyer’s agent find foreclosure properties for you. To locate a foreclosure sales specialist, call local brokers and ask if they are the listing agent for any banks.

Either way, ask the real estate professional which lenders’ homes they’ve sold, how many buyers they’ve represented in a foreclosed property purchase, how many of those sales they closed last year, and who they legally represent.

If the agent represents the lender, don’t reveal anything to her that you don’t want the lender to know, like whether you’re willing to spend more than you offer for a house.

2. Be ready for complications. In some states, the former owner of a foreclosed home can challenge the foreclosure in court, even after you’ve closed the sale. Ask your agent to recommend a real estate attorney who has negotiated with lenders selling foreclosed homes and has defended legal challenges to foreclosures.

Have your attorney explain your state’s foreclosure process and your risks in purchasing a foreclosed home. Set aside as much as $5,000 to cover potential legal fees.

3. Work with your agent to set a price. Ask your real estate agent to show you closed sales of comparable homes, which you can use to set your price. Start with an amount well under market value because the lender may be in a hurry to get rid of the home.

4. Get your financing in order. Many mortgage market players, such as Fannie Mae, require buyers to submit financing preapproval letters with a purchase offer. They’ll also reject all contingencies. Since most foreclosed homes are vacant, closings can be quick. Make sure you have the cash you’ll need to close your purchase.

5. Expect an as-is sale. Most homeowners stopped maintaining their home long before they could no longer make mortgage payments. Be sure to have enough money left after the sale to make at least minor, and sometimes substantive, repairs.

Although lenders may do minor cosmetic repairs to make foreclosed homes more marketable, they won’t give you credits for repair costs (or make additional repairs) because they’ve already factored the property’s condition into their asking price.

Lenders will also require that you purchase the home “as is,” which means in its current condition. Protect yourself by ordering a home inspection to uncover the true condition of the property, getting a pest inspection, and purchasing a home warranty.

Be sure you also do all the environmental testing that’s common to your region to find hazards such as radon, mold, lead-based paint, or underground storage tanks.

More from HouseLogic
What you need to know about the homebuyer tax credit (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/homebuyer-tax-credit-what-you-need-know/)

How to claim your homebuyer tax credit (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/claim-your-homebuyer-tax-credits/)

Other web resources
How to buy a foreclosure from Fannie Mae (http://www.fanniemae.com/homepath/homebuyers/buying_fanniemaeowned.jhtml)

What to consider when buying a foreclosure as your first home (http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/article-29589.html)

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who purchased a foreclosed condominium and found herself in the middle of a months-long dispute between the former homeowner and the bank over whether the foreclosure was conducted properly. Six months after paying the full purchase price, she was finally able to enter the property. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

Visit houselogic.com for more articles like this. Reprinted from HouseLogic with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS
Copyright 2010. All rights reserved.

Q-A Series – GENERAL FINANCING QUESTIONS:THE BASICS

Q. WHAT IS A MORTGAGE

Generally speaking, a mortgage is a loan obtained to purchase real estate. The “mortgage” itself is a lien (a legal claim) on the home or property that secures the promise to pay the debt. All mortgages have two features in common: principal and interest.

Q. WHAT IS A LOAN TO VALUE (LTV) HOW DOES IT DETERMINE THE SIZE OF MY LOAN

The loan to value ratio is the amount of money you borrow compared with the price or appraised value of the home you are purchasing. Each loan has a specific LTV limit. For example: With a 95% LTV loan on a home priced at $50,000, you could borrow up to $47,500 (95% of $50,000), and would have to pay,$2,500 as a down payment.

The LTV ratio reflects the amount of equity borrowers have in their homes. The higher the LTV the less cash homebuyers are required to pay out of their own funds. So, to protect lenders against potential loss in case of default, higher LTV loans (80% or more) usually require mortgage insurance policy.

Q. WHAT TYPES OF LOANS ARE AVAILABLE AND WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF EACH

Fixed Rate Mortgages: Payments remain the same for the the life of the loan

Types
– 15-year
– 30-year

Advantages
– Predictable
– Housing cost remains unaffected by interest rate changes and inflation.

Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMS): Payments increase or decrease on a regular schedule with changes in interest rates; increases subject to limits

Types
– Balloon Mortgage- Offers very low rates for an Initial period of time (usually 5, 7, or 10 years); when time has elapsed, the balance is clue or refinanced (though not automatically)
– Two-Step Mortgage- Interest rate adjusts only once and remains the same for the life of the loan
– ARMS linked to a specific index or margin

Advantages
– Generally offer lower initial interest rates
– Monthly payments can be lower
– May allow borrower to qualify for a larger loan amount

Q. WHEN DO ARMS MAKE SENSE

An ARM may make sense If you are confident that your income will increase steadily over the years or if you anticipate a move in the near future and aren’t concerned about potential increases in interest rates.

Q. WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF 15- AND 30-YEAR LOAN TERMS

30-Year:
– In the first 23 years of the loan, more interest is paid off than principal, meaning larger tax deductions.
– As inflation and costs of living increase, mortgage payments become a smaller part of overall expenses.

15-year:
– Loan is usually made at a lower interest rate.
– Equity is built faster because early payments pay more principal.

Q. CAN I PAY OFF MY LOAN AHEAD OF SCHEDULE

Yes. By sending in extra money each month or making an extra payment at the end of the year, you can accelerate the process of paying off the loan. When you send extra money, be sure to indicate that the excess payment is to be applied to the principal. Most lenders allow loan prepayment, though you may have to pay a prepayment penalty to do so. Ask your lender for details.

Q. ARE THERE SPECIAL MORTGAGES FOR FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYERS

Yes. Lenders now offer several affordable mortgage options which can help first-time homebuyers overcome obstacles that made purchasing a home difficult in the past. Lenders may now be able to help borrowers who don’t have a lot of money saved for the down payment and closing costs, have no or a poor credit history, have quite a bit of long-term debt, or have experienced income irregularities.

Q. HOW LARGE OF A DOWN PAYMENT DO I NEED

There are mortgage options now available that only require a down payment of 5% or less of the purchase price. But the larger the down payment, the less you have to borrow, and the more equity you’ll have. Mortgages with less than a 20% down payment generally require a mortgage insurance policy to secure the loan. When considering the size of your down payment, consider that you’ll also need money for closing costs, moving expenses, and – possibly -repairs and decorating.

Q. WHAT IS INCLUDED IN A MONTHLY MORTGAGE PAYMENT

The monthly mortgage payment mainly pays off principal and interest. But most lenders also include local real estate taxes, homeowner’s insurance, and mortgage insurance (if applicable).

Q. WHAT FACTORS AFFECT MORTGAGE PAYMENTS

The amount of the down payment, the size of the mortgage loan, the interest rate, the length of the repayment term and payment schedule will all affect the size of your mortgage payment.

Q. HOW DOES THE INTEREST RATE FACTOR IN SECURING A MORTGAGE LOAN

A lower interest rate allows you to borrow more money than a high rate with the some monthly payment. Interest rates can fluctuate as you shop for a loan, so ask-lenders if they offer a rate “lock-in”which guarantees a specific interest rate for a certain period of time. Remember that a lender must disclose the Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of a loan to you. The APR shows the cost of a mortgage loan by expressing it in terms of a yearly interest rate. It is generally higher than the interest rate because it also includes the cost of points, mortgage insurance, and other fees included in the loan.

Q. WHAT HAPPENS IF INTEREST RATES DECREASE AND I HAVE A FIXED RATE LOAN

If interest rates drop significantly, you may want to investigate refinancing. Most experts agree that if you plan to be in your house for at least 18 months and you can get a rate 2% less than your current one, refinancing is smart. Refinancing may, however, involve paying many of the same fees paid at the original closing, plus origination and application fees.

Q. WHAT ARE DISCOUNT POINTS

Discount points allow you to lower your interest rate. They are essentially prepaid interest, With each point equaling 1% of the total loan amount. Generally, for each point paid on a 30-year mortgage, the interest rate is reduced by 1/8 (or.125) of a percentage point. When shopping for loans, ask lenders for an interest rate with 0 points and then see how much the rate decreases With each point paid. Discount points are smart if you plan to stay in a home for some time since they can lower the monthly loan payment. Points are tax deductible when you purchase a home and you may be able to negotiate for the seller to pay for some of them.

Q. WHAT IS AN ESCROW ACCOUNT DO I NEED ONE

Established by your lender, an escrow account is a place to set aside a portion of your monthly mortgage payment to cover annual charges for homeowner’s insurance, mortgage insurance (if applicable), and property taxes. Escrow accounts are a good idea because they assure money will always be available for these payments. If you use an escrow account to pay property tax or homeowner’s insurance, make sure you are not penalized for late payments since it is the lender’s responsibility to make those payments.

5 Feng Shui Concepts to Help a Home Sell

To put the best face on a listing and appeal to buyers who follow feng shui principles, keep these tips in mind.

1. Pay special attention to the front door, which is considered the  mouth of chi (chi is the  life force of all things) and one of the most powerful aspects of the entire property. Abundance, blessings, opportunities, and good fortune enter through the front door. It s also the first impression buyers have of how well the sellers have taken care of the rest of the property. Make sure the area around the front door is swept clean, free of cobwebs and clutter. Make sure all lighting is straight and properly hung. Better yet, light the path leading up to the front door to create an inviting atmosphere.

2. Chi energy can be flushed away wherever there are drains in the home. To keep the good forces of a home in, always keep the toilet seats down and close the doors to bathrooms.

3. The master bed should be in a place of honor, power, and protection, which is farthest from and facing toward the entryway of the room. It s even better if you can place the bed diagonally in the farthest corner. Paint the room in colors that promote serenity, relaxation, and romance, such as soft tones of green, blue, and lavender.

4. The dining room symbolizes the energy and power of family togetherness. Make sure the table is clear and uncluttered during showings. Use an attractive tablecloth to enhance the look of the table while also softening sharp corners.

5. The windows are considered to be the eyes of the home. Getting the windows professionally cleaned will make the home sparkle and ensure that the view will be optimally displayed.

Source: Sell Your Home Faster With Feng Shui by Holly Ziegler (Dragon Chi Publications, 2001)

Reprinted from REALTOR magazine (REALTOR.org/realtormag) with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS .
Copyright 2008. All rights reserved.

But Seriously, What Can I Afford

One of the most important questions you need to ask yourself in the home buying process is:  How much can I pay for a house and still have a life

Ultimately, only you can decide what you can afford to spend monthly on a house payment and still be able to live the lifestyle you wish. However, a calculation provided by your mortgage lender may help you to make your determination.

When applying for a home loan, your mortgage lender will do a calculation that reveals the maximum amount the lender will lend to you. The calculation is based on a simple formula: The proposed house payment plus any fixed monthly debt payments (like credit cards and car payments) divided by your gross monthly income (your total wages before taxes are taken out) equals a percentage. Typically, mortgage lenders want that percentage to be less than 42%.

This equation is illustrated in the example below:
$1,230 (House Payment + Fixed Monthly Debt)
3,000 (Gross Monthly Income)
———
41%

Based upon this equation, after adding up your debts and reviewing your income, you may discover you can afford a pretty big mortgage payment. On the other hand, you may want to look at that number a little closer. If you borrow the maximum amount allowed, you may find that your house payment is more than you can afford based on other monthly expenditures not accounted for in the equation. For instance, the equation doesn t take into consideration money you might spend on recreation activities. If these are important to you and you don t want to give them up, you may need to keep your house payment lower than the maximum allowed in order to pay for these other expenditures.

Your best bet is to develop a budget and consider all of the typical expenses you have.

Use the form below to add up all of your monthly expenses. If there are some expenses  like auto insurance  you only pay every six months or yearly, divide by the number of months to determine your monthly expense. It s best to get everything down on paper.

Take a few minutes now and create your budget by listing the major categories where you think you have or will spend money during a typical month.

My Monthly Budget
Housing
$ ___________ Estimated house payment & association fees
$ ___________ Estimated property taxes, insurance, PMI
$ ___________ Electricity, gas
$ ___________ Phone
$ ___________ Water, sewage, garbage
Food
$ ___________ Groceries
$ ___________ Fast Food
$ ___________ Dining out
$ ___________ Beverages
Other living expenses
$ ___________ Personal care (hair, toiletries)
$ ___________ Laundry and dry cleaning
$ ___________ Clothing/shoes/hats
$ ___________ Gifts
$ ___________ Monthly membership dues/subscriptions
Transportation
$ ___________ Car payments
$ ___________ Gas & oil
$ ___________ Normal car maintenance
$ ___________ License and registration fees
$ ___________ Auto insurance
$ ___________ Parking fees
$ ___________ Bus, taxi, subway, carpool
Educational expenses (if applicable)
$ ___________ Tuition
$ ___________ Books
$ ___________ Lab fees
$ ___________ School supplies
Childcare and pet care (if applicable)
$ ___________ Day care
$ ___________ Baby/pet sitters
$ ___________ Medical/Veterinary
$ ___________ Toys
$ ___________ Special foods
$ ___________ Clothes
Expecting the unexpected
$ ___________ Traffic Tickets
$ ___________ Car Repairs
$ ___________ Medical/Dental care
(Insert other categories unique to you here)
$ ___________ ____________________________
$ ___________ ____________________________

$ ___________ Total Monthly Expenditures

* Taxes, insurance and PMI (private mortgage insurance) costs vary. Your real estate agent can help you estimate these.

Next, determine your monthly income below:

Wages and tips
$ ___________ (less taxes and other deductions)
$ ___________ Investment Income
$ ___________ Other
$ ___________ Total net monthly income

Finally, subtract your total monthly expenditures from your total monthly income. Note: Your net income, used in determining what you can afford, is different than your gross income, used to determine what you qualify to borrow.

$ ________ Total Monthly Income: (transfer $ amount from above)
– $ ________ Total Expenditures: (total of your expenses above)
= $ ________ Ending Balance

Now that you have everything down on paper, borrowing the maximum allowed may not look too good anymore! You may want to consider buying a little less house to keep a little more of your life! You may have heard the term  House rich, cash poor. That phrase was coined by people who didn t budget beforehand!

Finally, once you have a general idea of what type of house payment you can afford each month, you ll want to determine what that monthly payment will buy you in terms of the selling price of a home. Based on your estimated monthly payment, should you be looking at homes selling in the $100,000, 200,000, or $300,000 price range Your real estate agent can estimate this for you, or you can check out a  mortgage calculator on-line, which will ask a few simple questions and then do the calculation for you.

Tax Benefits of Homeownership

The tax deductions you re eligible to take for mortgage interest and property taxes greatly increase the financial benefits of homeownership. Here s how it works.

Assume:
$9,877 = Mortgage interest paid (a loan of $150,000 for 30 years, at 7 percent, using year-five interest)
$2,700 = Property taxes (at 1.5 percent on $180,000 assessed value)
______

$12,577 = Total deduction

Then, multiply your total deduction by your tax rate.
For example, at a 28 percent tax rate: 12,577 x 0.28 = $3,521.56
$3,521.56 = Amount you have lowered your federal income tax (at 28 percent tax rate)

Note: Mortgage interest may not be deductible on loans over $1.1 million. In addition, deductions are decreased when total income reaches a certain level.

Reprinted from REALTOR magazine (REALTOR.org/realtormag) with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS .
Copyright 2008. All rights reserved.

6 Tips for Buying a Home in a Short Sale

By: G. M. Filisko

By preparing for a real estate short sale, you can emerge with a great home at a favorable price.

When sellers need to sell their home for less than they owe on their mortgage, they’re shooting for a short sale. Short sale homes can sometimes be bargains, but only if you do your homework, stay patient, and remain unemotional during the sometimes lengthy and difficult short sale process.

Here are six tips for protecting yourself emotionally and financially when bidding on a short sale.

1. Get help from a short sale expert
A real estate agent experienced in short sales can identify which homes are being offered as short sales, help you determine a purchase price, and advise you on what to include in your offer to make the lender view it favorably. Ask agents how many buyers they’ve represented in short sales and, of those, how many successfully closed the transaction.

2. Build a team
Ask agents to recommend real estate attorneys knowledgeable in short sales and title experts. A title officer can do a title search to identify all the liens attached to a property you’re interested in. Because each lienholder must consent to a short sale, a property with multiple liens, like first and second mortgages, mechanic’s and condominium liens, or homeowners association liens, will be harder to purchase.
A title search may cost $250 to $300 up front, but it can help weed out less desirable properties requiring multiple approvals.

3. Know the home’s fair market value
By agreeing to a short sale, lenders are consenting to lose money on the loan they made to the sellers to purchase the home. Their goal is to keep those losses as low as possible. If your offer is dramatically less than the home’s fair market value, it may be rejected. Your agent can help you identify the price that’s good for you. The lender will determine whether approval is in its best interest.

4. Expect delays
There are two stages to a short sale. First, the sellers must consent to your purchase offer. Then they must submit it to their lender, along with documentation to convince the lender to agree to the sale.
The lender approval process can take weeks or months, even longer if the lender counteroffers. Expect bigger delays if several lienholders are involved; each can make a counteroffer or reject your offer.

5. Firm up your financing
Lenders will weigh your ability to close the transaction. If you’re preapproved for a mortgage, have a large downpayment, and can close at any time, they’ll consider your offer stronger than that of a buyer whose financing is less secure.

6. Avoid contingencies
If you must sell your current home before you can close on the short-sale property, or you need to close by a firm deadline, your offer may present too many moving parts for a lender to approve it.
Also, consider ordering an inspection so you’re fully informed about the home. Keep in mind that lenders are unlikely to approve an offer seeking repairs or credits for such work. You’ll probably have to purchase the home “as is,” which means in its present condition.

This article includes general information about tax laws and consequences, but isn’t intended to be relied upon by readers as tax or legal advice applicable to particular transactions or circumstances. Consult a tax professional for such advice; tax laws may vary by jurisdiction.

More from HouseLogic
What you need to know about the homebuyer tax credit (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/homebuyer-tax-credit-what-you-need-know/)

(http://thegreenists.com/food/ted-talk-being-a-weekday-vegetarian/5803) How to claim your homebuyer tax credit (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/claim-your-homebuyer-tax-credits/)
Other web resources
More on short sales (http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/article-30016.html)

Real-life discussions of short sales (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php storyId=104803015)

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who luckily has avoided the need for a short sale on her properties. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

Visit houselogic.com for more articles like this. Reprinted from HouseLogic with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS
Copyright 2010. All rights reserved.

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